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Home > DREAMS THAT HAVE COME TRUE > La Palma Mega Ttsuanmi information and when it will happen - the entire east coast of The United States will be hit with a Mega Tsunami reaching over 1,000 feet high
71 days after the La Palma earthquake?  eruption  Landslide tsunami reaches NYC at 300 meters.  We are on the wrong side of Flordia for this event, good news is that there will be time to get to higher ground.  See past dreams on this Mega Tsunami event o
71 days after the La Palma earthquake?  eruption  Landslide tsunami reaches NYC at 300 meters.  We are on the wrong side of Flordia for this event, good news is that there will be time to get to higher ground.  See past dreams on this Mega Tsunami event on December 21st, 2021, not sure what time but all past dreams confirm December 21st as the date of the MegaTsuanmi
 
 
La Palma Mega Tsunami information and when it will happen - the entire east coast of The United States will be hit with a Mega Tsunami reaching over 1,000 feet high  more at 



info

Cumbre Vieja tsunami hazard From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Image of an island taken from above The island of La Palma in
the Atlantic Ocean The island of La Palma in the Canary Islands is at risk of undergoing a large landslide, which could cause a tsunami in the Atlantic Ocean.
Volcanic islands and volcanoes on land frequently undergo large landslides/collapses, which have been documented in Hawaii for example. A recent example is Anak
Krakatau, which collapsed to cause the 2018 Sunda Strait tsunami.

Steven N. Ward and Simon Day in a 2001 research article proposed that a Holocene change in the eruptive activity of the Cumbre Vieja volcano and a fracture on the
volcano that formed during an eruption in 1949 may be the prelude to a giant collapse. They estimated that such a collapse could cause tsunamis across the
entire North Atlantic and severely impact countries as far away as North America. Later research has debated whether the tsunami would still have a significant
size far away from La Palma, as the tsunami wave may quickly decay in height away from the source, and interactions with the continental shelves could further
reduce its size. Evidence indicates that most collapses in the Canary Islands took place as multistage events that are not as effective at creating tsunamis,
and a multi-stage collapse at La Palma likewise would result in smaller tsunamis.

The recurrence rate of similar collapses is extremely low, about one every 100,000 years or less in the case of the Canary Islands. Other volcanoes across the
world is at risk of causing such tsunamis.

Contents 1	Sector collapses and tsunamis caused by them 1.1	Tsunami hazards 2	Regional context: Cumbre Vieja and the Atlantic Ocean 3	Models
3.1	Model by Ward and Day 2001 3.2	Later models 4	Criticism 4.1	Probability 5	Potential impact 6	Other volcanoes with such threats 7
References 7.1	Sources 8	External links Sector collapses and tsunamis caused by them Giant landslides and collapses of ocean island volcanoes were first
described in 1964 in Hawaii and are now known to happen in almost every ocean basin.[1] As volcanoes grow in size they eventually become unstable and collapse,
generating landslides[2] and collapses such as the failure of Mount St. Helens in 1980[3] and many others.[4] In the Hawaiian Islands, collapses with volumes of
over 5,000 cubic kilometres (1,200 cu mi) have been identified.[5]

A number of such landslides have been identified in the Canary Islands, especially in the more active volcanoes El Hierro, La Palma and Tenerife[6] where about
14 such events are recorded through their deposits.[7] They mostly take the form of debris flows[6] with volumes of 50–200 cubic kilometers (12–48 cu mi)[7]
that emanate from an amphitheater-shaped depression on the volcanic island and come to rest on the seafloor at 3,000–4,000 meters (9,800–13,100 ft) depth. They
do not appear to form through individual collapses; multi-stage failures lasting hours or days appear to be more common[6] as has been inferred from the
patterns of landslide-generated turbidite deposits in the Agadir Basin north of the Canary Islands.[8] The most recent such event took place at El Hierro 15,000
years ago[6] and was later re-dated to have occurred between 87,000±8,000 (margin of uncertainty) and 39,000±13,000 years ago.[9]

Many processes are involved in the onset of volcano instability and the eventual failure of the edifice.[10] Mechanisms that destabilize volcanic edifices to
the point of collapse include inflation and deflation of magma chambers during the entry of new magma, intrusion of crypto domes and dykes, and instability of
slopes under loading from lava flows and oversteepened lava domes. Periodic collapses have been found at some volcanoes, such as at Augustine and Volcan de
Colima.[11] Shield volcanoes have different mechanical properties than stratovolcanoes as well as flatter slopes and undergo larger collapses than the latter.
[12] Finally, the mechanical stability both of the volcanic edifice and the underlying basement and the influence of climate and sea-level changes play a role
in volcano stability.[11]

Tsunami hazards Large collapses on volcanoes have generated tsunamis, of which about 1% relates to volcanic collapse;[4] both small collapses[1] and earthquake-
linked landslides that took place in historical times generated tsunamis.[13] The 1998 Papua New Guinea earthquake, in particular, drew attention to this hazard.
[14] The most recent such tsunami is the 2018 Sunda Strait tsunami, which was caused by a flank collapse of Anak Krakatau and caused at least 437 fatalities.
[15] The possibility of a large collapse of this volcano causing a tsunami was known already before the 2018 event.[16]

Other historically recorded examples include the 1929 Grand Banks earthquake, the 1958 Lituya Bay tsunami,[17] a 2002 tsunami at Stromboli[14] that caused
severe damage to coastal settlements,[5] the 1888 tsunami caused by the Ritter Island collapse[18] which killed about 3000 people[5] and is the largest
historical tsunami-forming collapse with a volume of 5 cubic kilometers (1.2 cu mi),[19] and the 1792 Shimabara collapse of Unzen volcano in Japan which claimed
4,000 or 14,538 victims.[5][2] In total, volcanically generated tsunamis are responsible for about 20% of all fatalities related to volca

71 days after the La Palma earthquake? eruption Landslide tsunami reaches NYC at 300 meters. We are on the wrong side of Flordia for this event, good news is that there will be time to get to higher ground. See past dreams on this Mega Tsunami event o

71 days after the La Palma earthquake? eruption Landslide tsunami reaches NYC at 300 meters. We are on the wrong side of Flordia for this event, good news is that there will be time to get to higher ground. See past dreams on this Mega Tsunami event on December 21st, 2021, not sure what time but all past dreams confirm December 21st as the date of the MegaTsuanmi


La Palma Mega Tsunami information and when it will happen - the entire east coast of The United States will be hit with a Mega Tsunami reaching over 1,000 feet high more at



info

Cumbre Vieja tsunami hazard From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Image of an island taken from above The island of La Palma in
the Atlantic Ocean The island of La Palma in the Canary Islands is at risk of undergoing a large landslide, which could cause a tsunami in the Atlantic Ocean.
Volcanic islands and volcanoes on land frequently undergo large landslides/collapses, which have been documented in Hawaii for example. A recent example is Anak
Krakatau, which collapsed to cause the 2018 Sunda Strait tsunami.

Steven N. Ward and Simon Day in a 2001 research article proposed that a Holocene change in the eruptive activity of the Cumbre Vieja volcano and a fracture on the
volcano that formed during an eruption in 1949 may be the prelude to a giant collapse. They estimated that such a collapse could cause tsunamis across the
entire North Atlantic and severely impact countries as far away as North America. Later research has debated whether the tsunami would still have a significant
size far away from La Palma, as the tsunami wave may quickly decay in height away from the source, and interactions with the continental shelves could further
reduce its size. Evidence indicates that most collapses in the Canary Islands took place as multistage events that are not as effective at creating tsunamis,
and a multi-stage collapse at La Palma likewise would result in smaller tsunamis.

The recurrence rate of similar collapses is extremely low, about one every 100,000 years or less in the case of the Canary Islands. Other volcanoes across the
world is at risk of causing such tsunamis.

Contents 1 Sector collapses and tsunamis caused by them 1.1 Tsunami hazards 2 Regional context: Cumbre Vieja and the Atlantic Ocean 3 Models
3.1 Model by Ward and Day 2001 3.2 Later models 4 Criticism 4.1 Probability 5 Potential impact 6 Other volcanoes with such threats 7
References 7.1 Sources 8 External links Sector collapses and tsunamis caused by them Giant landslides and collapses of ocean island volcanoes were first
described in 1964 in Hawaii and are now known to happen in almost every ocean basin.[1] As volcanoes grow in size they eventually become unstable and collapse,
generating landslides[2] and collapses such as the failure of Mount St. Helens in 1980[3] and many others.[4] In the Hawaiian Islands, collapses with volumes of
over 5,000 cubic kilometres (1,200 cu mi) have been identified.[5]

A number of such landslides have been identified in the Canary Islands, especially in the more active volcanoes El Hierro, La Palma and Tenerife[6] where about
14 such events are recorded through their deposits.[7] They mostly take the form of debris flows[6] with volumes of 50–200 cubic kilometers (12–48 cu mi)[7]
that emanate from an amphitheater-shaped depression on the volcanic island and come to rest on the seafloor at 3,000–4,000 meters (9,800–13,100 ft) depth. They
do not appear to form through individual collapses; multi-stage failures lasting hours or days appear to be more common[6] as has been inferred from the
patterns of landslide-generated turbidite deposits in the Agadir Basin north of the Canary Islands.[8] The most recent such event took place at El Hierro 15,000
years ago[6] and was later re-dated to have occurred between 87,000±8,000 (margin of uncertainty) and 39,000±13,000 years ago.[9]

Many processes are involved in the onset of volcano instability and the eventual failure of the edifice.[10] Mechanisms that destabilize volcanic edifices to
the point of collapse include inflation and deflation of magma chambers during the entry of new magma, intrusion of crypto domes and dykes, and instability of
slopes under loading from lava flows and oversteepened lava domes. Periodic collapses have been found at some volcanoes, such as at Augustine and Volcan de
Colima.[11] Shield volcanoes have different mechanical properties than stratovolcanoes as well as flatter slopes and undergo larger collapses than the latter.
[12] Finally, the mechanical stability both of the volcanic edifice and the underlying basement and the influence of climate and sea-level changes play a role
in volcano stability.[11]

Tsunami hazards Large collapses on volcanoes have generated tsunamis, of which about 1% relates to volcanic collapse;[4] both small collapses[1] and earthquake-
linked landslides that took place in historical times generated tsunamis.[13] The 1998 Papua New Guinea earthquake, in particular, drew attention to this hazard.
[14] The most recent such tsunami is the 2018 Sunda Strait tsunami, which was caused by a flank collapse of Anak Krakatau and caused at least 437 fatalities.
[15] The possibility of a large collapse of this volcano causing a tsunami was known already before the 2018 event.[16]

Other historically recorded examples include the 1929 Grand Banks earthquake, the 1958 Lituya Bay tsunami,[17] a 2002 tsunami at Stromboli[14] that caused
severe damage to coastal settlements,[5] the 1888 tsunami caused by the Ritter Island collapse[18] which killed about 3000 people[5] and is the largest
historical tsunami-forming collapse with a volume of 5 cubic kilometers (1.2 cu mi),[19] and the 1792 Shimabara collapse of Unzen volcano in Japan which claimed
4,000 or 14,538 victims.[5][2] In total, volcanically generated tsunamis are responsible for about 20% of all fatalities related to volca

I_can_still_see_the_light_house2C_Brian_Laudire_case.jpg Gabrielle_Petito_located-_Fly_Geyser_-_arrest_made_in_fl_-_numbers_-_he_still_has_her_other_phone.jpg 10_Oct_2021_1_71_days_after_the_La_Palma_earthquake_eruption_Landslide_tsunami_reaches_NYC_at_300_meters__We_are_on_the_wrong_side_of_Flordia_for_this_event2C_good_news_is_that_there_will_be_time_to_get_to_higher_ground.jpg Subliminal_Session_17_-_happiness_and_love_-_make_every_day_its_best_and_others_will_follow___.jpeg Subliminal_Session_11_-_Good_luck_and_fortune_change_your_brain_cells_and_change_your_life.jpeg
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