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The Sodder Children Maurice Martha Louis Jennie and Betty This is the man responsible for the Sodder Childrens death here is where he buried them~0From

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The Sodder Children - Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie, and Betty
This is the man responsible for the Sodder Childrens death, here is where he buried them
Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie, and Betty are still missing, this is the exact area IAW the DD. You can barely see it but there are small pieces of copper just under the grass, use a metal detector to find them. Almost certain in this case, sadly the man in my drawing is still alive. My dream was nothing like people think happened.



Christmas Eve 1945, in Fayetteville, West Virginia. George and Jennie Sodder went to sleep as nine of their ten children settled in for the evening. Their tenth child was away from home, serving in the military. At around 1 a.m., shortly after the calendar flipped over to Christmas Day, a fire broke out in the Sodder home. George Sodder and his wife escaped the inferno with four of their children, but the other five seemed to vanish from the scene of the blaze.
George Sodder reportedly broke a window during the fire, re-entered the house, and quickly made his way through the smoke and flames that enveloped the downstairs. He reportedly figured his five children who didn’t make it out were trapped upstairs. No fire trucks arrived at the house until 8 a.m., seven hours after the blaze. The Sodder house burned to the ground, and the five missing Sodder children were never seen or heard from again. Maurice, 14; Martha 12; Louis, 9; Jennie, 8; and Betty, 5, disappeared without a trace.
George and Jennie Sodder reportedly refused to believe their five missing children were dead, especially after a search of the grounds revealed no human remains. According to Smithsonian magazine, the chief of the fire department said the blaze was so hot that it would have destroyed the bodies. A state police inspector blamed the deadly fire on bad wiring.
But the Sodders became suspicious when they pieced together strange events leading up to the deadly fire. A man looking for work at the Sodder house a few months before the incident had told George Sodder that the fuse boxes in the back of the house were “going to cause a fire someday.” But the power company had recently checked the wiring and said it was working properly.
At about the same time, according to Smithsonian, an insurance salesman allegedly became angry with George when he turned down a life insurance policy. The man warned, “Your goddamn house is going up in smoke, and your children are going to be destroyed. You are going to be paid for the dirty remarks you have been making about Mussolini.”
George was born in Italy and was allegedly outspoken about his dislike for Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, sometimes reportedly getting into intense arguments with other Italians in their hometown of Fayetteville. Jennie remembered hearing a loud thud on the roof about an hour before she noticed smoke coming into her bedroom, questioning the suggestion that bad wiring caused the fire.
In the years after the fire, people reported tips about the missing Sodder children around the country. One alleged that daughter Martha was living in a convent in St. Louis. Another claimed the children were living with a relative of Jennie. In 1968, 23 years after the fire, Jennie received a letter with no return address and a Kentucky postmark. The letter contained a photo of a man in his 20s and, written on the backside, the words: "Louis Sodder," "I love brother Frankie," "ilil Boys," and "A90132" or "A90135." The Sodders reportedly hired a private detective to track to the lead, but to no avail. The five missing Sodder children were never seen again


ON Christmas Eve in 1945, a fire ripped through the home George Sodder lived in with his wife Jennie and nine of their ten children.
George, Jennie and four of their kids managed to make it out alive. Horrifyingly, the five other children were killed in the blaze - but no trace of them has ever been found.

Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie and Betty Sodder were in the fire, but their bodies were never found
The fire was found to be caused by faulty wiring of the house in Fayetteville, West Virginia, although that was questioned because the Christmas tree lights were still on after it broke out. Also, George had only recently had the home rewired and double checked.
This was just one of the details which led the devastated parents to believe their five children Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie and Betty had been kidnapped.
George tried to get back into the house to rescue his kids during the blaze, but the ladder he needed to use was missing.

The children's parents George and Jennie never gave up hope they'd be found, and distributed leaflets to help the search
On top of that, his van wouldn't start and rain water collected in a barrel on their property was completely frozen.
Even odder, once the flames were out and people could get back into their house there was no sign of the children.

Jennie Sodder with her eldest son John
There were no bones at all, but also no way they could have been cremated.
This led George and Jennie to believe their kids never died.
They turned the site of their home into a memorial garden in honor of the children, then in the 50s, they created a billboard that went up on a local road asking for information. They even offered a reward for any information which proved what had happened.

Sadly, the flyer stayed in place until Jennie passed away in 1988. George passed away in 1969.
So what did happen to Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie, and Betty Sodder?
The parents were sure they'd been kidnapped, and there was speculation a child-selling agency could have been involved.
Backing this up was the fact that just two months before the fire, George and his wife had got into a row with an insurance seller who lived in their Fayetteville area.

A billboard asking for information on the missing children
They hadn't wanted to shell out for what he was selling. He was furious and told them their home would be destroyed in a fire and their kids would disappear.
Adding more fuel - the man was also part of the jury who decided the blaze was an accident.
In 1968, the family was sent a photo which is was claimed was from their missing son Louis. Unbelievably, the policeman who was supposed to be looking into it vanished too.
The_Sodder_Children__Maurice_Martha__Louis__Jennie_and_Betty_This_is_the_man_responsible_for_the_Sodder_Childrens_death_here_is_where_he_buried_them.png
The Sodder Children Maurice Martha Louis Jennie and Betty This is the man responsible for the Sodder Childrens death here is where he buried themThe Sodder Children - Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie, and Betty
This is the man responsible for the Sodder Childrens death, here is where he buried them
Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie, and Betty are still missing, this is the exact area IAW the DD. You can barely see it but there are small pieces of copper just under the grass, use a metal detector to find them. Almost certain in this case, sadly the man in my drawing is still alive. My dream was nothing like people think happened.



Christmas Eve 1945, in Fayetteville, West Virginia. George and Jennie Sodder went to sleep as nine of their ten children settled in for the evening. Their tenth child was away from home, serving in the military. At around 1 a.m., shortly after the calendar flipped over to Christmas Day, a fire broke out in the Sodder home. George Sodder and his wife escaped the inferno with four of their children, but the other five seemed to vanish from the scene of the blaze.
George Sodder reportedly broke a window during the fire, re-entered the house, and quickly made his way through the smoke and flames that enveloped the downstairs. He reportedly figured his five children who didn’t make it out were trapped upstairs. No fire trucks arrived at the house until 8 a.m., seven hours after the blaze. The Sodder house burned to the ground, and the five missing Sodder children were never seen or heard from again. Maurice, 14; Martha 12; Louis, 9; Jennie, 8; and Betty, 5, disappeared without a trace.
George and Jennie Sodder reportedly refused to believe their five missing children were dead, especially after a search of the grounds revealed no human remains. According to Smithsonian magazine, the chief of the fire department said the blaze was so hot that it would have destroyed the bodies. A state police inspector blamed the deadly fire on bad wiring.
But the Sodders became suspicious when they pieced together strange events leading up to the deadly fire. A man looking for work at the Sodder house a few months before the incident had told George Sodder that the fuse boxes in the back of the house were “going to cause a fire someday.” But the power company had recently checked the wiring and said it was working properly.
At about the same time, according to Smithsonian, an insurance salesman allegedly became angry with George when he turned down a life insurance policy. The man warned, “Your goddamn house is going up in smoke, and your children are going to be destroyed. You are going to be paid for the dirty remarks you have been making about Mussolini.”
George was born in Italy and was allegedly outspoken about his dislike for Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, sometimes reportedly getting into intense arguments with other Italians in their hometown of Fayetteville. Jennie remembered hearing a loud thud on the roof about an hour before she noticed smoke coming into her bedroom, questioning the suggestion that bad wiring caused the fire.
In the years after the fire, people reported tips about the missing Sodder children around the country. One alleged that daughter Martha was living in a convent in St. Louis. Another claimed the children were living with a relative of Jennie. In 1968, 23 years after the fire, Jennie received a letter with no return address and a Kentucky postmark. The letter contained a photo of a man in his 20s and, written on the backside, the words: "Louis Sodder," "I love brother Frankie," "ilil Boys," and "A90132" or "A90135." The Sodders reportedly hired a private detective to track to the lead, but to no avail. The five missing Sodder children were never seen again


ON Christmas Eve in 1945, a fire ripped through the home George Sodder lived in with his wife Jennie and nine of their ten children.
George, Jennie and four of their kids managed to make it out alive. Horrifyingly, the five other children were killed in the blaze - but no trace of them has ever been found.
5
Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie and Betty Sodder were in the fire, but their bodies were never found
The fire was found to be caused by faulty wiring of the house in Fayetteville, West Virginia, although that was questioned because the Christmas tree lights were still on after it broke out. Also, George had only recently had the home rewired and double checked.
This was just one of the details which led the devastated parents to believe their five children Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie and Betty had been kidnapped.
George tried to get back into the house to rescue his kids during the blaze, but the ladder he needed to use was missing.
5
The children's parents George and Jennie never gave up hope they'd be found, and distributed leaflets to help the search
On top of that, his van wouldn't start and rain water collected in a barrel on their property was completely frozen.
Even odder, once the flames were out and people could get back into their house there was no sign of the children.
5
Jennie Sodder with her eldest son John
There were no bones at all, but also no way they could have been cremated.
This led George and Jennie to believe their kids never died.
They turned the site of their home into a memorial garden in honor of the children, then in the 50s, they created a billboard that went up on a local road asking for information. They even offered a reward for any information which proved what had happened.

Sadly, the flyer stayed in place until Jennie passed away in 1988. George passed away in 1969.
So what did happen to Maurice, Martha, Louis, Jennie, and Betty Sodder?
The parents were sure they'd been kidnapped, and there was speculation a child-selling agency could have been involved.
Backing this up was the fact that just two months before the fire, George and his wife had got into a row with an insurance seller who lived in their Fayetteville area.

A billboard asking for information on the missing children
They hadn't wanted to shell out for what he was selling. He was furious and told them their home would be destroyed in a fire and their kids would disappear.
Adding more fuel - the man was also part of the jury who decided the blaze was an accident.
In 1968, the family was sent a photo which is was claimed was from their missing son Louis. Unbelievably, the policeman who was supposed to be looking into it vanished too.

This is the photo which was said to be of missing Louis
Another theory is that the mafia had something to do with it.
George had a coal-trucking business that was constantly being targeted by gangsters - the photo apparently from Louis had "90132" on it, which is a Sicilian postcode.
However, it's also been suggested that firemen searching the initial seen did find some bone fragments and internal organs. They didn't tell the family for fear of upsetting them too much.
   
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