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Home > MISSING PERSONS, 2018 - 2021 > Maddox Ritch killer opened 2-1-2019

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Maddox Ritch killer Dream number 11105 26 September 2018 5 psychic prediction0 views todayMaddox Ritch killer - a dream from says (704) 833-0075 he killed him with this, police have the wrong property, no water in ?? Maddox Ritch

(704) 833-0075 is a public listing on Wilson Farm Rd in Gastonia, NC
case at https://briansprediction.com/maddox-ritch

Nearly two years ago, the weeklong search for 6-year-old Maddox Ritch didn’t end the way the community had hoped. Ritch, who was diagnosed with autism, was found dead near a Gastonia park on Sept. 27, 2018. Community members helped form a search party until the boy was found. Hundreds of law enforcement officers and search and rescue teams spent countless hours searching for Maddox. According to the autopsy report, Maddox died of probably drowning and had multiple wounds on his upper neck likely caused by an animal attack. Maddox went missing at Rankin Lake Park in Gastonia on Sept. 22, 2018, while with his dad and his father’s girlfriend. Six days later, his body was found at Long Creek. Since then, an FBI special agent who assisted in the search for Maddox developed a one-page questionnaire for investigators to use when a child with autism goes missing. “I wanted to make sure that if I had another opportunity, I’d be ready,” said Special Agent James Granozio, who works in the Bureau’s Charlotte Field Office and also leads one of the FBI’s four regional Child Abduction Rapid Deployment (CARD) Teams. According to the Charlotte FBI, CARD teams are composed of agents, intelligence analysts, operational specialists, and behavioral analysts who deploy on short notice when police departments request FBI assistance in missing child cases. The FBI said that after the Maddox case, the special agent learned all he could about autism and autistic children, reaching out to local and national organizations for information. The feedback led to the development of the checklist of baseline questions that Granozio said should be asked immediately of parents or caregivers of missing autistic children. One of the autism specialists Granozio spoke with during his research said the checklist was a good idea, particularly if time is critical. “Having a checklist and a fact sheet about a child can be very helpful, especially if the child has specific interests,” said Kim Stroble, clinic director of the Early Autism Project in Rock Hill. “Given that no child or person with autism is the same, I think this is great.” The FBI said the questionnaire has been circulated among the FBI’s CARD Team, which includes approximately 75 members in FBI field offices across the country. They, in turn, have distributed the material to local law enforcement agencies during training exercises on child abductions and joint search and rescue operations. The CARD Team holds multiple table-top-style exercises every year to prepare local law enforcement on how to properly respond to the infrequent events. Gastonia Police Department Chief Robert Helton told the FBI that things moved very quickly in the Maddox case, and it helped that his department had relationships in place with the local FBI. His department reached out to the Charlotte Field Office, which led to activation of the CARD Team. “My initial thought was, ‘We need all the help we can get right now,’” Helton said. “You know, every second counts when you have a child that’s missing. You have to act very quickly, and I think it was helpful for us to already have that established relationship.” The questionnaire, which is only available to law enforcement, has been part of the CARD Teams' deployment toolkits for more than a year now. Granozio and Gastonia Police Chief Helton both view it as the rare positive development from the Maddox Ritch case. “He was a little boy that was just running around having a good time. And he died,” Granozio said. “So we all wanted to know what we could learn from it to hopefully prevent it from happening again.”
     
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